Welcome to the PR Blogging Thought Leadership Arena of Champions Who Say Very Little, But Often, and with Many Words

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Tue, Jul 8 - 11:59 pm EDT | 6 years ago by
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There can never be too many … PR blogs. Or maybe there can be.

But as Tom Foremski notes, it’s a good thing when public relations firms adopt social media. They are called upon to recommend PR tactics, including those involving blogs and other consumer-generated content, so they might as well dip their feet in the ‘Sphere and find out what all the fuss is about.

Tech PR Nibbles masthead Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide’s Tech PR Nibbles could probably have Ogilvy-signaturebeen better named (at least it’s not PR Dribbles), but it’s definitely worth checking out, as is the more established Ogilvy 360 Digital Influence Blog.

In a July 3 post, Nicholas Ludlum sums up the problem with too many PR blogs:

“… [Most] blogs are launched as thought leadership platforms, thereby resulting in pressure on the bloggers themselves to write something new and exciting with every keystroke.

“I’ve believed for a long time that this is the reason some PR blogs are unreadable. Setting aside the inexcusably poor writing, many feel the need to establish thought leadership by writing – at great length and in a constant loop – about how social media is reinventing public relations. This leads to a constant recycling of ideas which is masked (poorly) by a mixture of breathless hyperbole, impenetrable linguistic complexity and the forceful declaration of the painfully obvious.

In my own defence, I want to declare that I aspire to Thought Followership. The fact that I write at great length and in a constant loop about various aspect of business and PR, is a sign of my grim determination and desperate need for attention. I feel no compunction to write anything new and exciting.

I could write more about Ogilvy’s blog, but that would just confirm Common Sense PR’s unreadableness, so I will instead nudge you in the direction of PR Tech Nuggets*, and leave the rest to fate.

(For the most comprehensive listing of PR blogs, check out Constantin Basturea’s labor of love.)

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  • http://www.livingstonbuzz.com Geoff Livingston

    I agree. There are many, they say the same things, and they say them over and over. I actually only keep a select few in my reader for that very reason. I don’t want my writing influenced meme land!

  • http://occamsrazr.com Ike

    Real “Thought Leaders” are just well-read enough to know which way the wind is blowing, but no so well-read that they regurgitate hot air or become blowhards.

  • http://www.techprnibbles.com/ Nick Ludlum

    I’m new to blogging, is it wrong to take perverse pleasure in one’s first comment? In any event, thanks for noticing us and taking the time to respond. For what its worth I think if people focus on just being ‘thoughtful’, the ‘leadership’ will eventually emerge.

  • http://www.commonsensepr.com Eric Eggertson

    Just noticed I didn’t get the second reference right to PR Tech Nibbles. Not having the confidence to pretend this was a subtle attempt to influence them to change their name, I’ll just have to tix the typo and slink back into my bloghole….

  • http://www.commonsensepr.com Eric Eggertson

    Nick: I would never try to take someone’s perverse pleasures away.

    Business blogs are as much about self-promotion as they are about advancing the conversation, so I don’t get too lathered about prognostications from on high. I just marvel that some of the Thought Leadership efforts seem to work so well for our glorious Thought Leaders.

  • http://www.techprnibbles.com/ Nick Ludlum

    “I just marvel that some of the Thought Leadership efforts seem to work so well for our glorious Thought Leaders.”

    -It is hard to believe, isn’t it? Then again, maybe it’s all relative. One person’s insight is another person’s dreck.

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