An Analytical Look at Brett Favre

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Thu, Feb 25 - 4:24 pm EDT | 4 years ago by
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Okay, I admit that when I see a sportscaster or blogger yak about Brett Favre, I tend to look away. It’s that “over hyped” thing about Favre that drives most people crazy. Simply put, they don’t want to hear about him anymore. But one thing is certain, Favre has carved out a name for himself as being a player with the most interceptions. He’s got the interception record, after all. That’s why I was particularly interested in David Arreola’s recent article called “Brett Favre: Dispelling The Myth of the Interception King.” The name alone is something to make you stop what you’re doing and read what he has to say, doesn’t it?

Arreola tried an analytical approach to this interception business when it comes to Favre. After all, statistics don’t lie, do they? (I know some of you are groaning at this, but still, give me a minute.) Arreola looked interception ratio, interception percentage, and the fact that Favre has never missed a game. (Obviously Arreola isn’t counting that unfortunate year with the Falcons.) The point is, when Favre started playing, he didn’t stop.

In all the accounts, Favre was found to be among the average compared to other quarterbacks when it came to interceptions. The final point Arreola makes is that:

in the second half of his career. From 2000-2009 Brett Favre has thrown 18 postseason interceptions against 19 touchdowns, hardly numbers befitting a future Hall of Famer.

He follows this by reminding us that Favre has some pretty good years before 2000. Does it dispel the interception king label? In my opinion, it only adds to the legend. But Arreola did an interesting job of running numbers. It still doesn’t change the fact that Favre is in the record books for most interceptions. But it does remind us that perhaps it isn’t the number of interceptions, but the fact that they are certainly ill-timed that really make the difference.

Image: Zuma Press

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