Why Climate Change is a Defense Issue

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Mon, Sep 29 - 9:00 am EDT | 2 years ago by
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    Lines of Departure - Global Warming

    In the old Star Trek series there were, as near as I can recall and whatever delusions Gene Roddenberry may have had to the contrary, only two lines of dialogue that were in any sense profound. One of these was to the effect that having is not always as pleasing a thing as wanting. The other was that, “Survival cancels programming.”

    Truth in advertising; I don’t believe in global warming or its recent cover-your-ass-by-covering-your-bases manifestation as “climate change.” Oh, I think the climate changes, all right; it always has and always will, up until the heat death of the universe. I simply doubt the integrity, veracity, intellectual rigor, and everything else about the whole warmista crew and their cobbled together pseudo-religion. I don’t approach it as a scientist, of course, less still as an intellectual, the entire selfish and dishonest class of which I utterly despise, along with their running dogs, the intelligentsia. Instead, I look at it as an experienced trial lawyer1; these are the most hysterical, least credible, most self-impeached group of witnesses I think I have ever even heard of. Indeed, when these folks used to say “global warming,” my mind always turned, automatically, to “ice age.”

    “Climate change” requires
    Solar output be ignored
    Or lose nice funding.2

     

    Impeached witnesses?

    Great Climate Change!
    For heretics, deniers,
    Jail cells are waiting.

     

    Hysterics?

    Climate change loonies
    Shriek, ‘Heresy! Blasphemy!’
    Whenever questioned.

     

    Pseudo-religious lunatics?

    Gathering firewood
    To burn up the deniers.
    We’ve seen this before.

     

    One notes, parenthetically, that folks among whose continuous mantras is the phrase “catastrophic rise in sea levels” still seem to live close to the coast rather than moving inland to Appalachia or the Rockies. One cannot help but wonder why. Somewhat similarly, why does anybody take seriously people like Al Gore or Prince Charles, lecturing the rest of the peasantry (that’s you and me, bubba) to cut back and live simply, while having personal carbon footprints so large they might actually rival some lesser nations?

    ******

    All that said, I note with amusement the cries of outrage in various right wing circles when the Pentagon announces, or is claimed to have announced, that climate change is a defense issue. Why the amusement? Because it is a defense issue, though I am skeptical that many of the denizens of the five sided puzzle-palace cum political whorehouse that is the Pentagon are thinking about it as a defense issue, except in the sense of defending senior officers’ careers. Still, the underlying logic of a recent report3 is really fairly solid, not especially politically correct, and was probably completely unread by anybody either waxing orgasmic with glee over getting the Pentagon on board with the religion of anthropogenic global warming or the folks readying pitchforks and ropes to deal with same.

    Great fireball in sky,
    How to explain you away
    When Martian icecaps melt?

     

    Why is it a “defense” issue? Two reasons; one is what was once called barbarian migration and the other is what the Algonquin, Iroquois, and Cherokee, to say nothing of Aztec, Inca, and Maya, probably called by some unpronounceable multi-syllabic word meaning, each in his own language, “Oh, crap, where did they come from?”

    Wondrous hockey stick
    Replaces Christ’s wooden cross
    Comes from white noise.

     

    Barbarian migration?4 5 Yes, civilization has been crushed several times, from the Mycenaean Bronze Age Collapse to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west, along with some ugly periods6 in Chinese history, and at least one conquest of India, all of which may have had a climactic component or may have been due entirely to changes in climate, to include changes in climate produced by volcanic eruption.7 The Hyksos in Egypt and the fall of the Minoan civilization may have been caused by that, too.

    Virgin SUV
    Cast into the volcano
    As the faithful dance.

     

    *****

    So if climate change has, throughout human history, set peoples in motion, fleeing the change in order to survive, wandering through and destroying civilizations in which they saw no value or held no stake, it may again. And if so, it has to be stopped at or past our borders. The experience of history – real history, not politically correct mumbo jumbo – is that not stopping a migration early means megadeaths, at the least, and, in the case of the modern world, it might well mean gigadeaths.

    Of course, depending on where the change hits worst, and the nature of it, we may be the migrating barbarians. (What? We can’t be barbarians? Ask the Mexicans, some time, whose memories are as long as anyone’s, how we sometimes acted in Mexico circa 1847 to 1849.) Yes, that means a bad enough climactic catastrophe and we are going to have to move and take someone else’s homeland away from them.

    Now consider the unifying factor in both of those possibilities. That’s right, one way or the other, we’re going to have to kill a whole bunch of probably Third World folks if we are to survive.

    Given that, it would be wise for us to keep a very large and powerful military, right? Yes, of course, that’s right. We’ll also want the rest of the world to be as poor and weak as possible, right? Whether we’re trying to defend our homeland from them or take their homelands for ourselves, right? Correct. We’d want to keep our industry and economy going strong, right, and them as weak as possible.

    So, of course, the high priests and priestesses of the religion of anthropogenic global warming are right on top of that, concerned with preserving us and… oh, screw it; I can’t write that with a straight face. No, they’re not trying to get us ready to deal with the human fallout from a disaster like that; they’re too concerned with wealth transfers to the people who are likely to be either our aggressors or our victims. Yes, as a matter of fact that does seem to imply that they’re quite concerned with weakening us and strengthening them, which would make them enemies of you and me and everyone who wants to preserve western civilization or, at least, has loved ones they’d like to keep alive and free.

    Then again, maybe their intent is to have someplace pleasant to fly to, while the rest of us die. After all:

    High Tranzi leeches
    Attend luxury conference
    Always fly first class.

     

    __________

    1 You guys knew I was on my third career, right? Yeah, I still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up. Poet is probably not going to be it, which news, I am sure, fills you all with great sadness.

    2 This and all the other haiku herein were taken from my book, Carnifex. Some are slightly modified. Remember, never bring a sonnet to a haiku fight.

    3 http://www.climate.org/topics/PDF/clim_change_scenario.pdf Note, here, that carbon dioxide hardly gets a mention. Indeed, the thrust of the paper is largely on credible natural events.

    4 Note: Pay little or no attention to such politically correct concepts as “Late Antiquity.” That’s just another example of the left consoling the West as they assist it in suicide. I highly recommend Bryan Ward-Perkins’ book on the subject for a thorough debunking of this PC claptrap.

    5 Note: As far as Python alumnus Terry Jones’ execrable Barbarians goes, you may be very skeptical of someone playing at history, who claims that the Roman Empire’s chief advantage vis a vis the barbarians was having a professional army, while neglecting to mention – though more likely he just never learned – that most of that empire was carved out by tough, disciplined, brave, non-professional but intensely patriotic citizen-soldier militia, and mostly by beating the tar out of non-Roman professionals. In short, Jones was full of it.

    6 “Ugly” can, in this case, be defined as, 20 million Chinese peasants disappearing from the census, exterminated to make room for grazing nomads’ animal herds and flocks.

    7 If Yellowstone blows, we’re all pretty screwed. And it may.

    Don’t miss last week’s column: Against Fire: The Wargame That Wasn’t.

    Tom Kratman is a retired infantry lieutenant colonel, recovering attorney, and science fiction and military fiction writer. His latest novel, The Rods and the Axe, is available from Amazon.com for $9.99 for the Kindle version, or $25 for the hardback. A political refugee and defector from the People’s Republic of Massachusetts, he makes his home in Blacksburg, Virginia. He holds the non-exclusive military and foreign affairs portfolio for EveryJoe. Tom’s books can be ordered through baen.com.

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      • Ori Pomerantz

        Does the Pentagon also prepare to deal with demographic change? The graying of America is sure to make it harder to find young men for the military. The sub-replacement fertility rate of many of our allies means we’ll be less able to count on them.

        • Tom Kratman

          They do, I think, but it’s a sensitive issue for a lot of reasons.

        • ajspades

          Yeah, the military/pentagon/governments are aware of demographics change and the potential threats therein. First world nations are aging and birthrates declining while third world nations are getting younger and birthrates increasing. That, paired up with a highly mobile refugee population may mean the barbarian migration beats out climate change. Some of the Scandinavian countries are already seeing some of this already.

      • Ori Pomerantz

        I don’t think climate change will have effects that are within an order of magnitude of what it had in pre-industrial society. Climate change affects where you can grow food. When 98% of the population is in food production, this requires everybody to move. When 2% of the population is in food production, the same event requires those 2% to move. As long as we have global trade, the population can probably stay put.

        In case of global cooling, I think we’ll either buy a lot of food from Central and South America, or conquer them so allow our agbusiness to use their land more efficiently. In case of global warming, I’m sure the Canadians won’t mind growing more food.

        • Albert

          And if fabber tech gets good enough, people can make and maintain their own high-tech food production.

        • Tom Kratman

          Ever been to the Third World? Maintaining high tech is not a universal forte.

        • James

          Sure it does.

          3rd world fabber,

          Wait for women to get rations from UN. Let her cook it for her and her kids. Come in eat food while raping the women. Maybe sell children.

          Dear god that’s depressing. I know its pretty much always been this way but damn.

        • Albert

          Which means the US might not have to worry about them _too_ much. We’ve got our own culturally toxic embracing “child-free” BS, and the number of people required to maintain a tech-base is going to shrink . . . at some point the productive start walking away and let the lotus eaters wither.

        • Tom Kratman

          Think here: Mfecane. How did it keep going?

        • Tom Kratman

          The problem there, Ori, is that intensive agriculture requires a degree of civilization or, at least, safety and order. These may be in short supply.

        • Ori Pomerantz

          If people who keep order are those that don’t starve, I think we’ll see enough people volunteer to police whatever needs to be policed to keep from starving.

        • Tom Kratman

          i think you may have it inverted, Ori. Civilization requires police, but it is often missed that police require civilization. They cannot deal with large scale and thoroughgoing barbarism.

        • Ori Pomerantz

          I meant “police” in the sense that the US is the world’s policeman.

        • Tom Kratman

          That’s about played out, too.

        • Anonymous

          Also South American phosphate rock for the production of artificial fertilizers, which is currently imported into the US by the megaton, and without which agriculture as it is currently practiced in the First World doesn’t work quite so well.

        • Tom Kratman

          Yes, though Chile may weather the storm.

        • Rick Randall

          Two words:

          1. Rhodesia

          2. Zimbabwe

      • sotarrthewizard

        **IF** Yellowstone blows ? More like **WHEN** Yellowstone blows AGAIN. Which is due Real Soon Now. In geologic terms, which means any time between right now and ~ the year 200,000 AD.

        Likewise, Ice Age ? We’re IN an Ice Age, have been for the last 2.58 million years, and are currently between Continental Glaciations. The next is due Any Day Now, again, in geologic terms, meaning roughly any time in the next 10,000 or so years. . .

        • Tom Kratman

          Well, anytime after the probable deaths of my grandchildren’s grandchildren is past when I have to worry about it.

      • Neil

        Red leaves in the gloom
        The view makes me pedantic
        “Martian” is too long

      • Neil

        Hysterical grant-grubbing aside, the only actual climate threat is the return of the ice. Global warming to the temperatures predicted by the models (which are not predictive, but that’s another story) in recorded history has always meant peace and prosperity.

        If, on the other hand, Canada and the Upper Midwest are under a mile-thick ice sheet, that’s a whole different ball of wax.

        • Ori Pomerantz

          I don’t think a new ice age is likely. If there’s one thing we know how to produce, it is pollution. This means that making the ice black so it wouldn’t reflect back so much sunlight is within our capabilities.

        • Tom Kratman

          Well, the Yellowstone model would probably not be helped by that; it would deposit plenty of dark crap on the surface, i think, but if there’s enough crud in the air the sun won’t get through to the surface, sufficiently…I suspect.

        • Guest

          Sorry. I guess thats an “F.”

        • Anonymous

          A model that’s not predictive? If it isn’t predictive, how is it a model? This is, of course, a rhetorical question. In the sciences, we say that a hypothesis must contain a testable proposition, and if isn’t testable, it’s meaningless noise.

          A very bright fellow named Schwarz once said, “Science is mathematical modeling of reality, empirically constrained.
          Science strives for spareness of form with maximum generality. Science
          discards models which make predictions not borne out by reality.”

          Perhaps more to the point, well. I’m not a bright guy, but I know who a few bright guys are and I can use the Internet to find stuff they say. Anyway, the next time someone tells you that the “Earth’s temperature” is rising, remember that Dr. Jerry Pournelle, science fiction author and retired NASA engineer, said:

          “in the late 1960’s, I found it difficult to come up with the average skin temperature of an astronaut in a full pressure suit to a one degree F accuracy. I used dime sized thin copper disks with thermocouples soldered to them; we taped them to the astronaut’s skin. We chose back of hand, mid back, mid abdomen, and other such places so that we would have some comparability: the point of the tests was to measure the ventilation systems in the suit. We could measure the air flow of the controlled temperature air we used for ventilation, and the input temperature of that air, so that got another thermocouple from the harness. One of the thermocouples in the 12 thermocouple set went into a carafe of melting ice; the ice had been frozen from distilled water. That gave us a reference temperature accurate to 0.1° F. The thermocouple machine printed what it could see at one minute intervals; when we consolidated the data we sampled those one-minute readings since we didn’t have the data entry capability to use them all for average…”

          Earth’s atmosphere, if we indulge the useful fiction that it only goes up 200 kilometers and stops there, is 100 billion cubic kilometers. The spacesuit’s volume was one fifth of a cubic meter. The Earth’s atmosphere is is 5 * 10^20 times the size of that spacesuit. That’s a five followed by twenty zeroes.

          If someone says that he knows the Earth’s temperature down to one tenth of a degree Celsius, and furthermore claims not merely to know this for the present day but also for centuries and even millennia in the past, and furthermore claims to be able to predict it for centuries into the future, that’s pretty impressive and I’m very curious about how the measurements were taken and how the predictive model works. The “climate scientists” get awfully quiet when you ask them those questions, though, and some of them even invoke baroque and bizarre conspiracy theories, accusing you of “shilling” for “Big Oil.” (“‘Shut up,’ he explained.”)

          Likewise, all of this “global warming” that they claim to have measured is claimed to have arisen by the mechanism of human activity adding to the carbon dioxide levels of the air. We are told that it absorbs infrared radiation. But so does water vapor, in the same frequency bands, and vastly more efficiently, by orders of magnitude. Carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth’s atmosphere are measured in parts per million, water vapor in percentage points. So there are appropriate scientific terms for this kind of claim. One of them is “preposterous.”

          In my opinion, as someone who took some undergrad science courses at university level long before this began, it’s rather simpler than that. You have a group of people calling themselves “climate scientists.” Who is and who is not a “climate scientist” isn’t clear. The late leader of this group, and creator of the “global warming” meme, one Stephen Schneider, was a mechanical engineer by training, also with some background in high-energy plasma physics, and had no academic training whatsoever in meteorology. When real meteorologists like Anthony Watts dare to point out that the Emperor has no clothes, they’re shouted down, slandered, and shut out, because they’re “not real climate scientists,” and accused of taking bribe money from “the oil companies” by people who live on multi-million-dollar grants that the National Science Foundation gives them to print phony studies in which they declare that we’re all doomed unless we go back to the caves, right now.

          But what is clear is that the late Dr. Schneider made a very lucrative career for the last four decades of his life out of making wild-eyed predictions that white people had offended Gaia by refusing to live in mud huts and hunt rats by candlelight with flint tools, and were about to suffer a horrendous divine punishment at the hands of Nemesis, Real Soon Now. In the 1970s he predicted an imminent ice age, destroying all civilization in the Northern Hemisphere by 1980. Then in the 1980s he was on the fringes of the hysteria about “acid rain” and the equally nonexistent “hole in the ozone layer” (short science lesson: ozone is a tremendously unstable form of oxygen that arises when ultraviolet radiation from the sun impinges upon the upper layers of the atmosphere, and, absent sunlight–like, during the 6 month long period of darkness in the Arctic and Antarctic–the ozone breaks down almost instantaneously, turning back into normal oxygen, and stays that way until spring and direct sunlight return, at which point ozone is instantaneously produced once again), then he returned to what psychiatrists used to call “l’idee fixee” and declared that civilization was about to be destroyed, Real Soon Now, by uncontrolled runaway increases in temperature caused, once again, by selfish ol’ Whitey, who had offended the Gods by the unspeakable hubris of thinking mud huts and watching half his children die of cholera before the age of four weren’t good enough for him.

          The late Dr. Schneider famously admitted in print in an interview with Discover Magazine way back in 1989 that it was all a shuck and jive to terrify the stupid proles into giving up authority over their own lives to “experts” who would make the “right” choices. Search for the phrase “double ethical bind” with your favorite search engine and you can read the words exactly as he spoke them, exactly as they were printed, exactly as ecofanatics have been denying he said, ever since.

          Anyway. tl;dr these people are transnational socialists and their claims of “climate change” are pseudoscientific agitprop in the service of an evil, insane, utterly vile ideology. Q.E.D.

      • ajspades

        Wouldn’t focusing on preventing the barbarians from becoming be a better solution?

        • Ori Pomerantz

          From becoming a threat? That would require policing the entire world. With 5% of the world’s population, I don’t think we can do it. Not without dusting off the Aedificare Imperii CI (= Empire Building 101) books left to us by the Romans.

        • ajspades

          I meant preventing the circumstances that enable barbarian migrations to exist. The one in question is created by climate change (regardless of what direction that change is).

          So if you prevent the climate change, you prevent (at least one) cause of barbarian migrations. Alternatively, if you won’t/can’t prevent the climate change, you can prevent other circumstances (drought, famine, sickness). Letting the rest of the world go to rot and ruin guarantees there will be barbarian migrations.

          *We* don’t have to police the whole world, nor should we; we should instead focus on helping the rest of the world create a world where they don’t need policing.

        • Tom Kratman

          How do we prevent Yellowstone from blowing?

        • Ori Pomerantz

          Two issues:

          1. Can we stop climate change? Assuming it is natural, how do we do that? Assuming it is anthropogenic, how do we get China and India to stay poor by not burning fossil fuels? I assume you’re not willing to fight them to enforce such policies.

          2. The rest of the world can already create a world where they don’t need policing. They choose not to do so.

        • Firestorm

          War Nerd, in some of his darker (by even his standards) moments, has submitted the scandalous—nay, blasphemous!—assertion that much of the world is in the shape it’s in not because the residents are under-nourished or under-educated or under-privileged or under-empowered, but perhaps because they LIKE THINGS THAT WAY.

          Think about it. Maybe they don’t like the blood and mud and dung in the streets, but each cultural model has its costs and benifits. Western civilization, as others here have noted, is getting closer and closer to a post-scarcity, post-labor and post-hardship economy, and how’s it going for us? Oh, we may all claim that we’d rather not go back to 12-hour shifts picking cotton and working in mills until we die (though I have family in living memory who lived happy lives doing both), but a world where the robots do all the hard work for us is clearly driving many to madness.

          How many third-worlders are going to take one look at this mindless circlejerk of service industry employees servicing other service industry employees and decide that they’d rather flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age?

          Quite a few, if Syria is any indication.

        • Firestorm

          War Nerd, in some of his darker (by even his standards) moments, has submitted the scandalous—nay, blasphemous!—assertion that much of the world is in the shape it’s in not because the residents are under-nourished or under-educated or under-privileged or under-empowered, but perhaps because they LIKE THINGS THAT WAY.

          Think about it. Maybe they don’t like the blood and mud and dung in the streets, but each cultural model has its costs and benifits. Western civilization, as others here have noted, is getting closer and closer to a post-scarcity, post-labor and post-hardship economy, and how’s it going for us? Oh, we may all claim that we’d rather not go back to 12-hour shifts picking cotton and working in mills until we die (though I have family in living memory who lived happy lives doing both), but a world where the robots do all the hard work for us is clearly driving many to madness.

          How many third-worlders are going to take one look at this mindless circlejerk of service industry employees servicing other service industry employees and decide that they’d rather flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age?

          Quite a few, if Syria is any indication.

        • Tom Kratman

          A friend of mine, a redleg captain in the Army, then, though he retired as a colonel, did the Peace Corps thing in Nepal before going in the Army. The guy he relieved told him, “If you can get them not to shit in the streets you’ll be doing better than I did.”

          “Like” is probably too strong a term, but _fear_ of what it might mean to change things seems to me about right.

        • Anonymous

          Didn’t a fellow named Kipling write a poem about this phenomenon, a long time ago? “Something something burden,” wasn’t it?

        • Tom Kratman

          Sort of, though the British Empire probably had some successes greater than any from the Peace Corps.

        • Tom Kratman

          A friend of mine, a redleg captain in the Army, then, though he retired as a colonel, did the Peace Corps thing in Nepal before going in the Army. The guy he relieved told him, “If you can get them not to shit in the streets you’ll be doing better than I did.”

          “Like” is probably too strong a term, but _fear_ of what it might mean to change things seems to me about right.

        • Tom Kratman

          A friend of mine, a redleg captain in the Army, then, though he retired as a colonel, did the Peace Corps thing in Nepal before going in the Army. The guy he relieved told him, “If you can get them not to shit in the streets you’ll be doing better than I did.”

          “Like” is probably too strong a term, but _fear_ of what it might mean to change things seems to me about right.

        • Tom Kratman

          A friend of mine, a redleg captain in the Army, then, though he retired as a colonel, did the Peace Corps thing in Nepal before going in the Army. The guy he relieved told him, “If you can get them not to shit in the streets you’ll be doing better than I did.”

          “Like” is probably too strong a term, but _fear_ of what it might mean to change things seems to me about right.

        • Firestorm

          War Nerd, in some of his darker (by even his standards) moments, has submitted the scandalous—nay, blasphemous!—assertion that much of the world is in the shape it’s in not because the residents are under-nourished or under-educated or under-privileged or under-empowered, but perhaps because they LIKE THINGS THAT WAY.

          Think about it. Maybe they don’t like the blood and mud and dung in the streets, but each cultural model has its costs and benifits. Western civilization, as others here have noted, is getting closer and closer to a post-scarcity, post-labor and post-hardship economy, and how’s it going for us? Oh, we may all claim that we’d rather not go back to 12-hour shifts picking cotton and working in mills until we die (though I have family in living memory who lived happy lives doing both), but a world where the robots do all the hard work for us is clearly driving many to madness.

          How many third-worlders are going to take one look at this mindless circlejerk of service industry employees servicing other service industry employees and decide that they’d rather flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age?

          Quite a few, if Syria is any indication.

      • Harry_the_Horrible

        I figure the reasons for making “climate change” a defense issue are:
        1. To launder defense money through Democrat friendly groups so that a significant portion ends up back in the Democrat coffers
        2. To further degrade the effectiveness of the US Military.

        • Tom Kratman

          You didn’t read the article, did you, Harry? Or the Pentagon report I footnoted for you? Tsk.

        • Harry_the_Horrible

          Sorry. I guess that is an “F” for the lesson.

        • Tom Kratman

          No, it’s what we used to call a “redo.”

          Seriously, Harry, there’s damned little coming from the Pentagon that isn’t depressing. That they’re willing to look at climate change as a possible barbarian migration issue, without any particular kowtowing to badevilwickenaughtybabadbadbad CO2, is a rather heartening thing. Go read it.

        • Ori Pomerantz

          Also, climate change is very real. We really are coming out of the little ice age, and before that there really was a medieval warm period, etc. Whether it is anthropogenic or not isn’t the Pentagon’s concern. How to deal with it is.

        • Rick Randall

          We *were* coming out of a mini ice age. We may have hit the climatic maximum for this cycle and be heading for another severe cooling regime.

          Either way, you are still correct – and global *cooling* is what is more generally correlated with mass barbarian migration, because it comes with severe drought and famine.

        • Harry_the_Horrible

          Downloaded and will read it. Right now, though, our invading barbarians is more of a “pull” issue than a push.
          One thing that is worrying me is that it looks like our military is letting US-born soldiers go and replacing them with said barbarians. That really turned out well for Rome…
          And how do illegal aliens even get a clearance?

        • Tom Kratman

          Good question.
          Actually, push and pull are both possibilities for barbarian migration.

        • Harry_the_Horrible

          Well, it isn’t climate change, but Defense needs to consider how to seal our borders against the hordes from South and Central America fleeing Ebola.
          Oh, wait. That would be racist, wouldn’t it?

      • Jack Withrow

        I had a very good History Professor in College back in the early 80′s. He had a theory that barbarian migrations happened at very regular intervals in history. By his theory we are just about to start the timeframe for the next migration to commence. Back then Climate Change was not a major part of the theory, it was mainly based on population pressure. But when you look at climate change, in every case: global cooling, it correlates pretty well with those migrations.

      • Firestorm

        Certainly something to consider if you live in the Piedmont: half of Georgia was under glaciers at one point in time, and the other half was under oceans.

        “Barbarian migration” is actually something I’ve considered in terms of community/regional defense scenarios. Best way I could think for handling it is something like what they did at the end of Lucifer’s Hammer: landmines, napalm and mustard gas.

      • Firestorm

        Certainly something to consider if you live in the Piedmont: half of Georgia was under glaciers at one point in time, and the other half was under oceans.

        “Barbarian migration” is actually something I’ve considered in terms of community/regional defense scenarios. Best way I could think for handling it is something like what they did at the end of Lucifer’s Hammer: landmines, napalm and mustard gas.

      • Firestorm

        Certainly something to consider if you live in the Piedmont: half of Georgia was under glaciers at one point in time, and the other half was under oceans.

        “Barbarian migration” is actually something I’ve considered in terms of community/regional defense scenarios. Best way I could think for handling it is something like what they did at the end of Lucifer’s Hammer: landmines, napalm and mustard gas.

      • Firestorm

        Certainly something to consider if you live in the Piedmont: half of Georgia was under glaciers at one point in time, and the other half was under oceans.

        “Barbarian migration” is actually something I’ve considered in terms of community/regional defense scenarios. Best way I could think for handling it is something like what they did at the end of Lucifer’s Hammer: landmines, napalm and mustard gas.

      • http://www.Park.IT Calvin Liu

        Mr. Kratman,
        I would note that while leaders of 3rd world nations have enthusiastically embraced climate change as a way to extort payments from wealthier nations – that this gravy train was in fact started by self serving Westerners seeking political and economic power for themselves.
        An NGO by any other name still smells like an NGO (Greenpeace).
        This isn’t to say that the original tenets of environmentalism or conservation are false – it is simply a route to power which has been co-opted due to its means to gather wealth and influence.

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